Tag Archives: The New Yorker

What Makes Content Go Viral? The New Yorker Offers Six Tips

The New Yorker recently published an article that attempts to answer the social web’s million dollar question:

“What was it about a piece of content—an article, a picture, a video—that took it from simply interesting to interesting and shareable? What pushes someone not only to read a story but to pass it on?”

This being the New Yorker, references to Aristotle were made. Classics aside, they identified three basic triggers:

“Ethics, emotion, logic—it’s credible and worthy, it appeals to me, it makes sense. If you look at the last few links you shared on your Facebook page or Twitter stream, or the last article you e-mailed or recommended to a friend, chances are good that they’ll fit into those categories.”

Among the tips they offer:

“First, he told me, you need to create social currency—something that makes people feel that they’re not only smart but in the know.” 

Here’s the link:

As you read through the article, keep the following questions in mind:

  • How can you apply these ideas to your own content sharing in general, and specifically to the posts you share through CoPromote?
  • Is the copy in your messages compelling and to the point?
  • Do people know what they’re clicking on?
  • Will sharing it add value to their social presence?

We have noticed that some of the messages that perform best on CoPromote’s platform are well written, compelling, give members a clear sense of what they are sharing, and sharing it adds value to their news feeds and social presence.

What has been your experience with successfully sharing viral content? Let us know!