Tag Archives: Engagement

Metrics Matters: Reach and Engagement Matter Most

Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so.

Galileo Galilei

You’ve created some content. You’ve shared it on the social web. How do you know it’s working? How can you tell what to optimize? Metrics!

Metrics measure how people are interacting with your posts. Depending on your strategy, you may need metrics that show sales, brand recognition, or audience growth. Before you start your next social marketing campaign, be sure to identify your goals, and also the tools and metrics by which you will measure success.

Here are “5 Metrics every marketer should be watching” via the  good folks at The Next Web. At the top of the list? Reach and Engagement, the very reason we built CoPromote for content creators.

Each social platform has its own specific metrics e.g. Facebook Insights, YouTube or Twitter analytics – but regardless of the nuances of way its presented, the most important aspects to look at are reach and engagement.

On CoPromote, Reach is how many people are connected to members that share your posts. Engagements are shares, likes, favorites, retweets, clicks. On average, CoPromote members sharing each other’s content can improve their reach and engagement metrics by up to 5-10X.

Screen Shot 2014-12-30 at 2.00.58 PM

Click through for more metrics that all content creators, not just marketers, should be watching. Join or login to boost a post and see for yourself.


Get More Social Bang For Your Tweets Than Katy Perry Or Oprah

A recent study by Online Journalism Blog looked at the click through rates for celebrities and drew a few interesting conclusions that CoPromote members may find useful:

  1. Celebrities with more balanced follower-to-following ratios (they followed people back), resulted in better engagement rates (more click throughs, retweets)
  2. Accounts that reply and retweet followers also had better engagement rates
  3. Politicians, due to the viral nature of their cause-centered work, tended to have better engagements than celebrities.

While you may not be a celebrity or a politician, these are three good points to keep in mind when managing your social media:

  1. Follow back
  2. Reply/retweet
  3. Share content with broad appeal

On CoPromote, our average RT rate is 15%, meaning that for every 100 views a request gets, members can expect 15 shares. This is  higher than the average engagement rate partly because members join CoPromote to do one thing: reach new people by sharing each other’s posts. Check the graphs and excerpts below for a preview, and click through for the rest of the report and details.

% of Followers Clicking

  • “famous individuals with a higher CTR tend to have a better followers to followed ratio”

Percentage of Followers Clicking

Followers-to-following Ratio Followers per Following

  • “Another factor that comes into play is also the number of @ tweets that each person sends.”

% of Followers Retweeting Percentage of Followers Retweeting

  • “Politicians have a ready-made audience who may be more likely to support their causes and retweet their tweets.”

Sources, thanks:



Twitter Stats for 2012

MediaBistro’s All Twitter blog recently pulled some stats from a report on social media published in Huffington Post by Brian Honigman.

Among some of the more interesting bits of data is this one:

  • 56% of customer tweets to companies are being ignored. (sources: AllTwitter)

One of the things we always remind Headliner users to do is follow up and engage once you’ve made contact with a new audience. This is how you convert them to your own followers, not by ignoring them. As much as some people would have you believe that social media can be automated, the best results are often achieved by those who take the time and energy to listen and respond, not just broadcast. If you’re going to demand people’s attention, you better make it worth their while, or they will take their eyeballs elsewhere, as their is no shortage of distractions on the internet.

 Other interesting stats:

Check out the rest of the stats at All Twitter here.

You can find the full Huffington Post report on Social Media Stats for 2012 here.

Trends: How the Top 250 Musicians on Facebook Work It

RootMusic analyzed how the top 250 musicians on Facebook work the platform and posted the results with the chart below.

Some key findings you should try to apply to your own band’s use of social media:

  • 7 out of 10 of the most popular pages on FB were musician pages
  • On average, the top 250 artists post 1.6 times a day
  • Fans engage with the Facebook wall more than the Band Page (35% vs 31%)
  • The top 3 genres were Pop (29%), Rock (28%) and Hip Hop (12%)

The key take-aways as always are: music is one of the most popular types on content on the social web and artists that engage their fan base consistently are the most successful. Headliner can help you amplify your message by introducing you to audiences that already like music like yours through compatible musicians. Where you take that introduction is entirely up to you, but hopefully this data will inspire you to engage them directly and frequently.

More info here.

Connected Consumer Affinity, or Get To Know Your Fans

We all want to think of music as art, and fans as devotees with great taste, but if we ignore that music is a business and fans are consumers, we risk never being able to quit our day jobs. Ideally, we would all be discovered overnight and get our own “Behind the Music” special simply for being kick-ass artists. But for many indie bands, promotion is like a second job. These days, moving units means getting to know your fans as well as you would like them to know and love your music.

Mashable recently posted a piece with a few tips on building connections with your consumers. How can you apply  these to your band and the business of promoting your music?

Check out the entire article HERE.

“Nine Laws of Consumer Affinity”

1. Identify where connected consumer attention is focused.

2. Define a higher purpose — genuine intentions that will attract connected consumers and give them something to align with.

3. Establish an identity and a presence worthy of affiliation. Give people something to believe in — something exciting to be a part of.

4. Design your engagement strategies to be beneficial and shareable — this is, after all, about shared experiences.

5. Localize the value, content, storefront and engagement program to match the culture and activity within each direct-to-consumer (D2C) community.

6. This isn’t a power play; stay consistent and dedicated through meaningful interaction.

7. Remain true to the original mission and intention. Do not be swayed by short-term temptations.

8. Recognize and reward community participants — reciprocity is a strong pillar of community relationships.

9. The adaptive business will listen, learn and change based on the needs of the connected consumer. That way, a brand will consistently stay relevant and valuable.